Larry Habegger

About Larry Habegger

Larry Habegger, executive editor of Travelers’ Tales, has visited more than fifty countries and six of the seven continents, traveling from the Arctic to equatorial rainforests, the Himalayas to the Dead Sea. In the 1980s he coauthored mystery serials for the San Francisco Examiner with James O’Reilly, and for thirty-one years wrote a syndicated newspaper column, “World Travel Watch.” Habegger regularly teaches travel writing at workshops and writers’ conferences, is a principal of the Prose Doctors (prosedoctors .com), and editor in chief of Triporati.com, a destination discovery site. He lives with his family on Telegraph Hill in San Francisco.

Bubble-Up

travelers-tales By Katherine Jamieson

A tropical love story in Guyana.

The one-room schoolhouse rang with the din of teenage girls’ voices in the humid afternoon air. Someone had erased the sentences with their adjectives and nouns underlined from the black wooden slab we used for a chalkboard and scrawled out a rough schedule for the upcoming concert: Indranie—Chutney dance; Onica—I Believe I Can Fly; Wanda—Modeling. Scratchy dub music played on the school’s dinged up tape deck, and a few girls gyrated their hips seductively to the deep bass line while the others sat around languidly braiding each other’s hair.

Deborah, the school prefect and informal director of the concert, was complaining to me. “Miss, dem first year girls actin’ stupidy, talking nuff nonsense. Miss, we must tell dem speak properly, and learn they lines, right, Miss?”

“Yes, yes, Deborah, please help them learn their lines,” I said fanning myself with some loose papers. I was sitting at one of the student desks, trying to imagine how the chaos in front of me would turn into a performance in the next six weeks, when we heard thumping sounds on the staircase.

Jordan’s Bull

travelers-tales

By James Michael Dorsey

A magical day in Mali.

Hippos surfaced with wiggling ears as the boat man poled our dhow past the submerged herd. We were both tense, expecting a bluff charge, while only feet away white pelicans with long golden beaks floated in the shallows casually scooping minnows in their great fleshy pouches. On the opposite shore the grass huts of the Fulani glowed like fiery tumbleweeds in the hazy sunrise as bare-breasted women pounded their dirty wash on river rocks. At this bend of Mali’s Niger River, the lethargic water resembles dark roasted coffee as it slowly meanders on towards the fabled city of Timbuktu. I was in old spear-and-loincloth Africa to chase the end of an era with my camera.

Eleventh Annual Solas Awards Winners!

travelers-talesWe're thrilled to announce the winners of the Eleventh Annual Solas Awards for Best Travel Story of the Year. Grand Prize winner James Michael Dorsey collected $1,000 for "Jordan's Bull," his powerful account of an encounter with a nomadic boy on an island in the Niger River in Mali. Katherine Jamieson won the silver award and $750 for "Bubble-Up," her poignant story of a surprising tropical love in Guyana. Anna Vodicka claimed the bronze award and $500 for "The Remnants of War: A Meditation on Peleliu," her thought-provoking essay about the power of nature and people to transcend the lasting effects of war. Congratulations to all, and here's the complete list of winners.

Not One, Not Two, But Three Award Winners!

travelers-talesThree of our books just won awards! Wings: Gifts of Art, Life, and Travel in France, Erin Byrne’s evocative collection of essays about her transformative travels in France won the top award in Travel at the Paris Book Festival. The Way of Wanderlust, Don George's deeply personal stories of four decades of world travel, won the Gold Award in Travel Essay in the Independent Publisher Book Awards (IPPY). The Soul of Place, Linda Lappin's imaginative creative writing workbook, won Gold in the Creative Process category in the Nautilus Book Awards. Congratulations to all three authors for these well-deserved honors.