Sean OReilly

About Sean O'Reilly

Sean O’Reilly is editor-at- large for Travelers’ Tales. He is a former seminarian, stockbroker, and prison instructor who lives in Virginia with his wife and three of their six children. He’s had a lifelong interest in philosophy and theology, and is the author of How to Manage Your Destructive Impulses with Cyber Kinetics and Authority. He is also CEO and founder of the Auriga Distribution Group, Johnny Upright, Fifth Access, and Redbrazil.com, a bookselling site.

Cities of the Sun, Renewed

by Sean O’Reilly
Cancun became a popular tourist destination in the 1970s, and at the same time, the ancient Mayan City of Cobá, which may have lain in ruins for ten centuries, slowly found a place in the annals of sites that must be seen. Cobá is about 45 miles east of Chichen Itza and about

Riverworld

by Sean O’Reilly
I am at the helm of a 59-foot houseboat, cutting steel blue water and steering through massively beautiful canyons. A long curve of beach shimmers in the distance against the backdrop of a ruined mesa. I am going to beach the boat like some Magellan discovering a new world for the first time.

Medical Vacations in Asia: A Great Way to Get Renewed in Mind and Body

by Sean O’Reilly and Carol Lamb
A “Medical Vacation” is a fantastic way to renew oneself in mind and body. When the body is relaxed and the mind is at ease, the quality of healing can be phenomenal. If you are one of those contemplating surgery in the near future, or know of someone who is

What I Did in the Doll House

by Sean O’Reilly
Many years ago, I flew to Boston to visit my brother in Watertown, Massachusetts. At the time he had a wonderful barn that he had converted into a two-story office and a guesthouse. The flooring downstairs was culled from the demolition of a local high school’s gym and the shelves were lined with

Introduction to Travelers’ Tales American Southwest

Utility workers found a mammoth bone a few years ago, a quarter of a mile from my home in Peoria, Arizona. They thought it was a log and left it by the side of the road. Just to the east of this serendipitous discovery, Indian petroglyphs continue to be found in the eroded hills that